feature biodiversity focus a winner for students

73535_Habitats - 11-12 - 1st - Robin Vlemmix- Year 11 - Woodvale Secondary College

Photo: Robin Vlemmix - Woodvale Secondary College

At Chevron Australia, we're proud of our role in showing that industry and the environment can co-exist with the right management.

For 18 years, the Chevron Focus Environment photography competition has inspired students from kindergarten to year 12 to celebrate their natural environment and reinforce the need to safeguard ecosystems for future generations.

The primary aim is to highlight the incredible depth of biodiversity in WA and the human efforts required to conserve and preserve it.

This year, almost 1,700 photographs were submitted by over 700 students from 101 schools.

The competition, open to all WA primary and secondary students, includes three subject categories that reflect Chevron's core values of protecting people and the environment:

  • Focus on WA's native species
  • Focus on WA's habitats and ecosystems; and
  • Focus on Sustainability in WA

Competition partner The West Australian presented the winning students and their schools their share of $25,000 in cash prizes – with one outstanding entry receiving the prestigious Harry Butler Award.

The award, in memory of Harry and his dedication to raising awareness about natural history and environmental conservation, this year went to Danny Melville from John Curtin College Of The Arts.

Former Chief Scientist Professor Lyn Beazley continued her position on the Chevron Focus Environment judging panel this year to select the Harry Butler Award winner and continue the legacy of her close friend, Dr Harry Butler.

72703_Harry Butler Award - 7-10 - HARRY BUTLER - Danny Melville- Year 9 - John Curtin College Of The Arts

Photo: Danny Melville - John Curtin College Of The Arts - 2021 Harry Butler Award

“What a great photo of a species unique to the southwest of our state! The photo captures a lot about the animal and the forest environment in which it lives and hunts by night. The large eyes, so perfectly in focus here, are characteristic of nocturnal species. The gecko needs to detect as much light as possible as it searches out its insect prey.”

Professor Lyn Beazley

Former Chief Scientist of Australia

The Chevron Focus Environment competition is delivered in partnership with Seven West Media.

A selection of winning pictures and captions will be published in in ED! Magazine in The West Australian (November 16, 2021 edition).